Code Blue: The First Collaboration Between Lambert and Riverwatch

Left+to+Right%3A+Eduardo+Aguila%2C+interning+at+Northside+Hospital%2C+Aline+Castro%2C+interning+at+Physician%27s+Express+Care%2C+and+Christina+Sun%2C+interning+at+DentFirst

Left to Right: Eduardo Aguila, interning at Northside Hospital, Aline Castro, interning at Physician's Express Care, and Christina Sun, interning at DentFirst

A​ ​group​ ​of​ ​seniors​ ​from​ ​Lambert​ ​headed​ ​down​ ​to​ ​Riverwatch​ ​Middle​ ​School​​ ​to​ ​participate​ ​in 
the​ ​first​ ​collaboration​ ​between​ ​the​ ​two​ ​schools.​ ​The​ ​project​ ​was​ ​titled​ ​“Code​ ​Blue”,​ ​and​ ​was 
carried​ ​out​ ​by​ ​seventh​ ​graders​ ​taking​ ​advanced​ ​life​ ​science.​ ​The​ ​seniors​ ​had​ ​completed​ ​the 
healthcare​ ​pathway​ ​and​ ​they are​ ​currently​ ​involved​ ​in​ ​internships​ ​at​ ​various​ ​medical​ ​practices. 
 
The​ ​project​ ​had​ ​been​ ​assigned​ ​to​ ​Riverwatch​ ​students​ ​in​ ​January,​ ​upon​ ​return​ ​from​ ​winter 
break.​ ​The​ ​students​ ​were​ ​divided​ ​into​ ​groups​ ​of​ ​six,​ ​and​ ​assigned​ ​a​ ​specific​ ​medical​ ​scenario. 
The​ ​given​ ​scenario​ ​included​ ​a​ ​review​ ​of​ ​symptoms,​ ​past​ ​medical​ ​history,​ ​current​ ​medications, 
and​ ​the​ ​results​ ​of​ ​a​ ​physical​ ​exam​ ​and​ ​lab​ ​orders.​ ​From​ ​this​ ​information​ ​the​ ​students​ ​began 
research​ ​in​ ​to​ ​diagnose​ ​the​ ​patient.  
 
The​ ​project​ ​incorporated​ ​more​ ​than​ ​just​ ​regurgitating​ ​learned​ ​information.​ ​It​ ​stimulated 
problem-solving​ ​skills,​ ​rational​ ​thought,​ ​and​ ​creativity.​ ​Each​ ​group​ ​created​ ​a​ ​distinguished 
hospital​ ​with​ ​a​ ​distinguished​ ​name,​ ​logo,​ ​and​ ​mission​ ​statement.​ ​During​ ​the​ ​presentation,​ ​each 
student​ ​was​ ​dressed​ ​in​ ​professional​ ​attire​ ​and​ ​took​ ​on​ ​individual​ ​roles​ ​as​ ​a​ ​specialized​ ​doctor. 
Contained​ ​in​ ​the​ ​slideshow​ ​presentations​ ​was​ ​the​ ​final​ ​diagnosis​ ​alongside​ ​a​ ​detailed​ ​course​ ​of 
treatment. 
 
The​ ​interns​ ​from​ ​Lambert​ ​were​ ​given​ ​rubrics​ ​and​ ​carefully​ ​graded​ ​the​ ​project.​ ​After​ ​each 
presentation,​ ​the​ ​interns​ ​would​ ​inquire​ ​about​ ​the​ ​project​ ​in​ ​connection​ ​to​ ​the​ ​larger​ ​world​ ​of 
medicine.​ ​Common​ ​questions​ ​included,​ ​“What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​average​ ​blood​ ​pressure​ ​for​ ​an​ ​adult?”​ ​or 
“What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​human​ ​body​ ​temperature​ ​in​ ​fahrenheit​ ​and​ ​celsius?”​ ​Several​ ​students​ ​were​ ​able​ ​to 
answer​ ​with​ ​impressive​ ​accuracy,​ ​while​ ​sometimes​ ​the​ ​questions​ ​were​ ​challenging,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​was 
not​ ​expected​ ​of​ ​the​ ​students​ ​to​ ​know​ ​the​ ​answer.  
 
A​ ​simple ​question​ ​was​ ​“What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​normal​ ​respiratory​ ​rate?”​ ​One​ ​student 
 answered​ ​with​ ​“80,”​ ​and​ ​another​ ​student​ ​answered​ ​with​ ​“100.”​ ​“​Think​​ ​​about​​ ​​that​​ ​​for​​ ​​a​​ ​​second,​ 
 ​there​​ ​​are​​ ​​60​​ ​​seconds​​ ​​in​​ ​​a​​ ​​minute,​​ ​​and​​ ​​that​​ ​​would​​ ​​be​ ​hyperventilating.​​ ​​The​​ ​​normal​​ ​​respiration​ 
 rate​​ ​​is​​ ​​12-20​​ ​​breaths​​ ​​per​​ ​​minute,”​​ ​​explained​​ ​​Aline​ ​Castro,​​ ​​an​​ ​​intern​​ ​​at​​ ​​a​​ ​​Physician’s​​ ​​office.​ ​The 
questions​ ​were​ ​apt​ ​for​ ​building​ ​a​ ​baseline​ ​of​ ​medical​ ​knowledge.  
 Projects​ ​presented​ ​by​ ​the​ ​much​ ​younger​ ​students​ ​were​ ​not​ ​void​ ​of​ ​new​ ​knowledge​ ​for​ ​the 
 interns.​ ​In​ ​one​ ​case,​ ​the​ ​determined​ ​diagnosis​ ​was​ ​​Guillain-Barré​ ​syndrome,​ ​a​ ​disease​ ​which 
was​ ​unknown​ ​to​ ​many​ ​of​ ​the​ ​interns.  
 
Once​ ​eighth​ ​grade​ ​arrives​ ​for​ ​students,​ ​which​ ​AP​ ​classes​ ​and​ ​career​ ​pathways​ ​to​ ​take​ ​at Lambert​ ​become​ ​​ ​important​ ​discussions.​ ​​Mrs.​ ​Melodi Shanks​ ​and​ ​Ms.​ ​Sarah​ ​Stream​ ​kept​ ​the idea that ​many​ ​students​ ​had​ ​shown​ ​an​ ​inclination​ ​toward the​ ​healthcare​ ​pathway ​and​ ​taking​ ​advanced​ ​science​ ​and​ ​math​ ​classes in mind when designing this project. 
“They​ ​have​ ​exceeded​ ​our​ ​expectations.​ ​They​ ​learned​ ​how​ ​all​ ​the​ ​body​ ​systems​ ​work​ ​together​ ​to 
keep​ ​the​ ​body​ ​functioning.​ ​And​ ​on​ ​top​ ​of​ ​that,​ ​whether​ ​they​ ​want​ ​to​ ​pursue​ ​a​ ​career​ ​in​ ​the 
 medical​ ​field​ ​or​ ​not.​ ​This​ ​is​ ​definitely​ ​something​ ​we​ ​will​ ​continue​ ​with​ ​next​ ​year.”​ ​said​ ​Mrs. 
Shanks.